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at a quarry in scotland. but, many as a matter of principle refused alternative service as well. and they were sent to prison. more than 6000 young englishman went to prison during the war. the largest number of people up to that point in time ever in prison for political reasons in a western democracy. they served their sentences in places like wandsworth prison in the photograph here, in southwest london. those that you can see stretched across the opening there is to prevent people from committing suicide. prison conditions were extremely harsh. prisoners lived under what was called the rule of silence, where you were not allowed to talk to your fellow prisoners. they found ways around it of course, tapping on cell walls and whispering to people and whatnot, but they lived several years under those conditions. the diet with terrible. there was a shortage of coal. the prisons were very cold. many people died in prison. so, i was fascinated by these war resisters. for the longest time, i could not figure out how, from a storytelling point of view, i was going to get the resisters and the gene
. there was a bribery scandal. the head of scotland yard is going to resign. i think they are going to try to bring it to the united states. i don't know that anything has been done here. somebody might have hacked into the 9/11 folks. i don't think the wall street journal had anything to do with that. i don't know that any of that went on here and as of right now, it's still in london. a lot of folks want to bring it here. >> what is your opinion on that, ed? >> other than the potential hacking into the 9/11 victims, i'm not sure pat is wrong on this. he may be right. the one thing we don't want it to become, speaking as a democratic progressive. we don't want it to be a witch hunt on murdock. we don't need that. >> right. >> the story is bad enough on its own. >> andrea, let me invite you in on this. we are expecting testimony from murdock and his son tomorrow. that's going to be a circus-like scene. it's unclear who had connection to all of this. >> i think they all have connections. anyone who has lived or worked there knows. peter you spent a lot of time in london, you know the close connectio
in scotland but as a matter of principle refuse to alternative services as well and sent to prison. more than 6,000 young englishmen went to prison during the war. the largest number of people up to the point* in time ever imprisoned for political reasons, they serve the sentences in places like here coming southwest london, that metal netting stretching across the opening is to prevent people from committing suicide. and prison conditions were extremely harsh. prisoners lived under the rule of silence rerun not allowed to talk to our fellow prisoners. they found ways around a buy tapping and whispering but to live under those conditions was tough. the diet was terrible, shortage comment it was cold and many people died in prison. i was fascinated by the stories. for the longest time i could not figure out how from a story telling point* of view i would get the resistors and the generals into the same book. i did not want to do a series of portraits of one then the other but then a clue came to me one day when i wis reading a scholarly article about a well-known pacifist. she was the ardent o
scotland yard guys whose names are, which is never going to happen, but i hope everybody vows to themselves and to their staffs, if they're editors, that we're going to put out a paper without stooping into the gutter. we're not going into the gutter. we're an instrument for helping people up, not to take the whole standards of our profession and lower them, that we end up saying that great men, giants preceded us, and those other ones that died for this profession should not be ashamed of using the name, using the thing, the word newspaper man or newspaper woman or journalist. that's something we ought to wear like a badge of honor. >> pete hamill, thanks so much for being here. >> thank you. >> next up, the african famine threatening the lives of millions, particularly children. it is the worst it has been in decades, and importantly, this may be a sign of things to come. food shortages in places you would never expect. [ male announcer ] introducing the ultimate business phone -- t the motorola expert from sprint. its powerful tools help you work faster and smarter so you can get back to
as scotland yard alleges, murdoch's company may have broken u.s. law. >> news corp is an american corporation and they are bound by american laws regardless of where the offense takes place. >> reporter: u.s. politicians are also latching on to an unconfirmed report from an unnamed source that "news of the world" hacked phones belonging to 9/11 victims. >> anyone who did this really forget the legality, just in terms of the morality of this is just beyond the pale. >> reporter: the 9/11 allegation appeared on sunday in light of congressional concerns, we called news international, the subsidiary and they told us they have seen no evidence that those allegations are true. >> stephanie gosk in london this morning. thanks as always. martin bashir, it's good to have you here. sometimes when i have you, i like to ask the simplest question first because i like your take. you spend a lot of time as a journalist in the u.k. and here in the united states. >> i worked for the sunday times between 1984 and 1985. >> as you've watched this story unfold over the last month or so, what jumps out at you? >>
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)